It seems there are two general approaches to new motorcycle design: modern/futuristic and retro/old school. The head-turning R nineT, which BMW launched in 2014 in an attempt to demonstrate it’s not just a brand for superlatively un-hip gray-haired dudes, represents the latter. At more than $15,000, the R nineT is still just a bit on the expensive side though, and to our pleasant surprise BMW has been releasing less-expensive variants of the original that keep getting cooler and cooler: the Scrambler, Pure, Racer and, most recently, the Urban G/S.

A fleeting glance at the Urban G/S might make you wonder if you just got a blast from the past. With its Light White high fender, headlight cover and gas tank with BMW Motorsport blue accents, tall, flat red seat and optional spoked rims, the Urban G/S bears a strong resemblance to its ancestor, the 1980 R80G/S—a nod to Gen Xers hungry for a taste of nostalgia. OK, fine, I’m one of them. I’ll admit the retro-cool Urban G/S plucks my child-of-the-’80s heartstrings.

BMW Urban GS
The Urban G/S is the fifth variant of the BMW R nineT (including the original Roadster). It evokes the nostalgia of the original R80G/S, quite possibly the first ever “adventure bike.” While it may look the part, the Urban G/S is really intended to stick to pavement and dirt roads, with limited luggage capacity and a riding position that’s more roadster than dual-sport. Photos by Drew Ruiz.

The Scrambler and Urban G/S share the same 3-piece chassis and suspension, which has longer travel than the road-only R nineTs (4.9 inches front, 5.5 inches rear compared to 4.7 inches front and back on the Roadster, Pure and Racer). Both come standard with cast wheels—19-inch front, 17-inch rear—that can be swapped for optional spoked rims ($500) and Metzeler Karoo knobby tires (a free, dealer-installed option). Like the other lower-priced variants, the Urban G/S also has a steel gas tank, single speedometer and non-adjustable conventional fork (with gaiters).

Unlike the Scrambler’s dual high pipes, the Urban G/S has a single 2-into-1 exhaust that unfortunately blats like a tuned Honda Civic. Earplugs help, but the noise turns heads—whether that’s good or bad I’ll leave up to you. The Urban G/S also perches the rider even higher than the Scrambler, with a 33.5-inch seat that’s more than half an inch taller, and 2.5 inches taller than the original R nineT Roadster. Taller riders might appreciate the roominess, as well as the flat but surprisingly well-padded seat.

BMW Urban GS
Despite its 19-inch front wheel, the Urban G/S is a capable canyon carver and will hold its own in the twisties.

Despite the resemblance to its R80G/S ancestor, the Urban G/S isn’t really intended for world-traveling off-road adventures, but it handles dirt roads and paved twisties with equal aplomb, and looks great doing it. The 19-inch front wheel slows left/right transitions somewhat, but the wide handlebar and low center of gravity make the Urban G/S a willing dance partner on a curvy road. Unlike the Karoo-shod Scrambler I rode at the launch in New Jersey, our Urban G/S bike was equipped with 90/10 Metzeler Tourance Next tires, and they provided adequate grip as I chased other journalists up the legendary Palomar Mountain Road at a recent Arai helmet launch. Like the Scrambler, the suspension gets a bit out of sorts on bumpy pavement at higher speeds, but staying relaxed on the handlebar and steady on the throttle lets the bike settle itself out.

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Powering the Urban G/S, and all the R nineT models, is the proven air/oil-cooled 1,170cc “Boxer” flat twin, which on the Jett Tuning dyno pumped out 99.5 horsepower at 7,800 rpm and 72.7 lb-ft of torque at 6,500 rpm when we tested the original back in 2016. It barks to life with a side-to-side shake and revs happily, preferring not to stay in too low a gear. Throttle response is smooth and manageable, although the shaft drive will give you a wake up snap if you pop the hydraulically actuated dry clutch lever too quickly.

BMW Urban GS
The small plastic headlight cover deflects just a bit of air above the rider’s helmet, and at speeds up to about 80 mph it’s surprisingly comfortable.

The Urban G/S’s weakest point is its lack of luggage, but snap on a magnetic tank bag and a small-ish tail bag, and you could go lightweight touring, like Senior Editor Drevenstedt did recently on the R nineT Pure. With judicious throttle use, the Urban G/S will return fuel economy in the low 40s, making the 4.5-gallon tank good for almost 200 miles.

Most Urban G/S buyers, however, aren’t likely buying the bike as a long-distance tourer. This is a machine meant to tug at your heart, evoke strong emotions and simply be fun to ride, and to those ends BMW has hit a home run.

BMW Urban GS
2017 BMW R nineT Urban G/S.

2017 BMW R nineT Urban G/S Specs

Base Price: $12,995
Price as Tested: $13,745 (spoked wheels, heated grips)
Warranty: 3 yrs., 36,000 miles
Website: bmwmotorcycles.com

Engine

Type: Air/oil-cooled, longitudinal opposed flat twin
Displacement: 1,170cc
Bore x Stroke: 101.0 x 73.0mm
Compression Ratio: 12.0:1
Valve Train: DOHC, 4 valves per cyl.
Valve Insp. Interval: 6,000 miles
Fuel Delivery: Fully sequential EFI, 50mm throttle bodies x 2
Lubrication System: Wet sump, 4.2-qt. cap.
Transmission: 6-speed, hydraulically actuated dry clutch
Final Drive: Shaft, 2.9:1

Electrical

Ignition: Electronic (BMS-MP)
Charging Output: 720 watts max.
Battery: 12V 14AH

Chassis

Frame: Tubular-steel bridge frame w/ engine as stressed member, Paralever single-sided cast aluminum swingarm
Wheelbase: 60.1 in.
Rake/Trail: 28.5 degrees/4.4 in.
Seat Height: 33.5 in.
Suspension, Front: 43mm stanchions, no adj., 4.9-in. travel
Rear: Single shock, adj. for spring preload & rebound damping, 5.5-in. travel
Brakes, Front: Dual 320mm floating discs w/ radial-mount opposed 4-piston calipers & ABS
Rear: Single 265mm disc w/ floating 2-piston caliper & ABS
Wheels, Front: Spoked, 3.00 x 19 in. (as tested)
Rear: Spoked, 4.50 x 17 in. (as tested)
Tires, Front: Tube-type, 120/70-R19 (as tested)
Rear: Tube-type, 170/60-R17 (as tested)
Wet Weight: 490 lbs. (as tested)
Load Capacity: 458 lbs. (as tested)
GVWR: 948 lbs.

Performance

Fuel Capacity: 4.5 gals., last 0.8 gal. warning light on
MPG: 91 PON min. (low/avg/high) 36.9/42.7/45.8
Estimated Range: 192 miles
Indicated RPM at 60 MPH: NA

Jenny’s Gear:
Helmet: Arai DT-X
Jacket: AGV Sport Arc
Riding Jeans: Rev’It Madison
Boots: Stylmartin Continental

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